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NASSP Statement on FDA’s Proposed Regulations on Flavored E-Cigarettes

NASSP logo

Reston, VA—NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti issued the following statement on the FDA’s proposed regulations on flavored e-cigarettes:

The nation’s principals applaud the Trump administration for hearing their call and taking decisive action to clear the market of flavored e-cigarettes. Principals consider e-cigarette use one of the greatest public health threats facing schools, and every principal can tell stories of how these dangerous products have both disrupted student learning and compromised student health. For these reasons, NASSP was an early and outspoken supporter of legislation to ban e-cigarette use, limit their appeal, and prevent student access to them. We recognize there is more work to be done to reach that goal—and we continue to encourage Congress to pass permanent legislation–but this decision by the Trump administration is a significant step in right direction.


About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

NASSP Statement on the 2019 PDK Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools

Reston, VA—NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti issued the following statement on the release of the 2019 Phi Delta Kappa Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools:

“We are in a full-blown crisis, and it’s only getting worse. Half of teachers are seriously considering leaving the profession. They’re telling their own kids that an education profession promises only long hours in the context of a perpetual budget crisis and the need for a side hustle to make ends meet, and that they’ll be vilified as part of the problem. Those conditions aren’t corrected by the occasional Starbucks card on Teacher Appreciation Day. Our nation needs serious financial and social investments to build professional regard for educators and to make education a profession of choice. Not surprisingly, this same reality is reflected in the principal ranks. NASSP, in cooperation with the Learning Policy Institute, is in the middle of an intensive study of principal attrition. Preliminary results indicate 35 percent of principals don’t make it past year three of their tenure for many of the same reasons teachers cite.

“In addition, the American public is responding to a real problem of inconsistent discipline in schools. With minority students suffering the brunt of that inconsistency, it shouldn’t surprise us that black respondents are far more sensitive to it. It’s why NASSP was so vocal in its support for the Obama-era guidance that encouraged school leaders to examine their data, identify their own blind spots, and employ more restorative practices in place of suspension and expulsion—efforts for which there is broad public support, according to the poll. Secretary DeVos set those efforts back by withdrawing the guidance, but NASSP and other civil rights organizations will continue to promote them in practice.”


About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

NASSP Names Three Outstanding Finalists for 2020 National Principal of the Year

Reston, VA—The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) today named Joey Jones, Lindsa McIntyre, and Kerensa Wing as the finalists for the 2020 NASSP National Principal of the Year (POY) award. Each of these principals has succeeded in providing high-quality learning opportunities for students as well as demonstrating exemplary contributions—including student wellness, collaborative leadership, innovation, and strategic management—to the profession.

Joey Jones

Joey Jones, Robert Frost Middle School, Rockville, MD

Jones strives for “PIE” in everything he does by seeking professionalism, integrity, and excellence. By instilling this mindset in himself and his staff, he has created a supportive learning environment that fosters a culture of well-being for each student. In fact, a recent school survey reported that more than 90 percent of students said they feel safe and that their teachers have high expectations for them to do well, and nearly 93 percent of staff said they would recommend Robert Frost Middle School as a good place to work. Culturally relevant teaching also plays a part in student wellness at the school. Jones and his team have facilitated student-to-student discourse to promote the sharing of peer perspectives; used authentic texts to reflect the diversity of the student population; and promoted asset thinking versus deficit thinking, where all students are viewed as “at promise” rather than some students being singled out as “at risk.” Furthermore, Jones focuses on developing fellow leaders and, over the past 17 years, has trained 14 award-winning educational leaders who have become associate superintendents, principals, or assistant principals.

Lindsa McIntyre

Lindsa McIntyre, Jeremiah E. Burke High School, Dorchester, MA

McIntyre was tasked with making big changes in her community after Jeremiah E. Burke High School was designated as a turnaround school—but it didn’t take her long to deliver results. She immediately engaged in a rigorous and inclusive redesign process in collaboration with a team of stakeholders and partners. Through collaborative leadership and innovation, she channeled her passionate interaction with the community; used targeted interventions to drive change in school culture, educator development, and personalized instruction; and fostered a collective belief in the whole child and the need to mitigate nonacademic needs of the student—ultimately transforming Burke High School into one of the safest schools in the district. McIntyre also adopted four core values into the school community: respect, responsibility, collaboration, and perseverance. These core values created a common language that established a shared school vision and mission that could be implemented into classrooms and shared spaces. While her focus is always on advancing each individual student, McIntyre also devotes her time to the professional development of her team, leading to a shared leadership model. She and her team have worked together to strengthen their instructional core by building authentic relationships between students, teachers, and content.

Kerensa Wing

Kerensa Wing, Collins Hill High School, Suwanee, GA

Wing believes that every student deserves a great teacher, which is why she makes a concerted effort to hire teachers who are content experts and student-focused in their approach. Because the classroom teacher has an enormous impact on student growth, she views her job of hiring, retaining, and training the best teachers as the most efficient path toward equity for students. She works with her staff in a professional learning community structure, implementing scheduling changes to accommodate common planning and collaboration time using research-based practices for students. As a result, student performance on state assessments rose between 3 and 13 percent in proficient and distinguished levels on all tests. Additionally, Wing chartered 27-minute advisement periods, where students have a standing appointment with a teacher who is responsible for connecting with and advocating for every student in their group. The weekly advisement schedule includes time for reading, goal setting, lessons, special interests, and more. Wing also gives herself time with students through an open-door policy and meets with students whenever they make a request.

“Great schools have great leaders, and Mr. Jones, Ms. McIntyre, and Ms. Wing are prime examples of principals who have purposefully and deliberately applied their leadership skills to support the needs of their schools,” stated NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti. “We are excited to honor these three principals for building unique school cultures with the goal of preparing each student for lifelong success, while also cultivating teachers and staff to meet their own professional ambitions.”

Principal of the Year finalists will be recognized at the 2019 NASSP Principals Institute, an event that convenes state principals from each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Department of State Office of Overseas Schools, and the U.S Department of Defense Education Activity. The event will be held in Washington, D.C., September 30–October 3, 2019, and will involve a series of professional development activities and meetings with congressional members.

The 2020 National Principal of the Year will be announced in October during National Principals Month. For more information, please visit www.principalsmonth.org.


About the POY program

The NASSP Principal of the Year (POY) program honors State Principals of the Year from each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Department of State Office of Overseas Schools, and the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity. Out of these exceptional school leaders, three are selected as finalists and one is ultimately selected for the National Principal of the Year award. The award recognizes outstanding middle level and high school principals who have succeeded in providing high-quality learning opportunities for students as well as demonstrating exemplary contributions to the profession.

For more information on the POY program, please visit www.nassp.org/poy.

About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor SocietyNational Junior Honor SocietyNational Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

NASSP Selects Maryland Principal Robert Motley of Atholton High School to Serve as President-Elect

BOSTON – Robert Motley, principal of Atholton High School in Columbia, MD, has been elected to serve as the 2019–20 president-elect of the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). Six school leaders from across the country were also elected to serve four-year terms on the 24-member NASSP Board of Directors

Motley has been a member of the board for four years and served as the chair of the NASSP Programs and Services Committee. Additionally, he was the board liaison to the Student Leadership Advisory Committee, where he worked with exceptional student leaders from around the country to advocate on Capitol Hill and shape the national student voice initiative.

In 2006, Motley was recognized as the Maryland State Assistant Principal of the Year by the Maryland Association of Secondary School Principals. He earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Maryland-College Park in French language and foreign language secondary education, and a master’s degree at The George Washington University in elementary and secondary educational administration and supervision. He is currently seeking his Ph.D. in instructional leadership at Notre Dame Maryland University.

“Robert has been a valuable member of the NASSP Board of Directors and we are thrilled that he will become our next president-elect,” stated NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti. “We also welcome the six new members to the board and look forward to the contributions they will make to continue to move our organization forward. Robert and the new board members will lend their voices, expertise, and experiences to our efforts to develop strong school leaders, providing the support they need to foster healthy and safe school communities and champion student leadership and equality.”

The six school leaders elected to the board for two-year and four-year terms include:

  • Julie Arnold, principal, Rio Rancho Cyber Academy Rio, Rancho, NM
  • Raechelle Fabrao, assistant principal, Kapolei Middle School, Kapolei, HI
  • Carole Kihm, principal, Longfellow Middle School, Falls Church, VA
  • Jen Lindaman, principal, Ankeny Centennial High School, Ankeny, IA
  • Gina Marie Pin, assistant superintendent, head of school, Joel Barlow High School—Region 9, Redding, CT
  • Albert Sackey, principal, Nathan Hale Middle School, Norwalk, CT

The new board members were elected during the association’s Members’ Assembly, held this year at the National Principals Conference in Boston, July 18–20. All board terms are effective August 1, 2019, as is Motley’s post of president-elect. Motley will serve under 2019–20 NASSP President Peter Kruszynski until August 1, 2020, when he will succeed to the NASSP presidency.

For a complete roster of the NASSP Board of Directors, please visit www.nassp.org/who-we-are/board-of-directors.


About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor SocietyNational Junior Honor SocietyNational Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

NASSP Releases New Framework to Promote Effective School Leadership

Reston, VA – The vision of effective school leadership just became clear and practical with the release of Building Ranks, an actionable framework developed by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. Building Ranks provides a cohesive and accessible picture of the leader’s evolving complex role—one that supports the success and well-being of each student and adult in the learning community. It promotes the ongoing growth of each school leader—in his or her unique context—by providing strategies and resources.

“Building Ranks is a powerful expression of contemporary school leadership and a platform for advancing innovative, adaptive, and equitable education throughout America’s schools,” said NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti. “We are confident Building Ranks will go a long way toward illuminating the specific areas where the principal can have the greatest and most effectual impact.”

Structurally, Building Ranks provides a model of 15 dimensions of principal practice under two domains: Building Culture and Leading Learning. The model was developed by a diverse team of principals and other experts in educational leadership. The standards-based framework contains authentic examples of principal practices, strategies, and resources, and aims to build a more effective learning community for principals.

The Building Ranks framework is brought to life by the Educational Leadership Product Suite, which includes:

Later this year, NASSP will add three resources to the Educational Leadership Product Suite:

Visit www.nassp.org/buildingranks for more information about the Building Ranks framework and download the Executive Summary.


About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor SocietyNational Junior Honor SocietyNational Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

NASSP Names 2019 Digital Principals of the Year

Reston, VA – The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) today named Beth Houf, Chris Lehmann, and Allison Persad as the 2019 Digital Principals of the Year (DPOY). Each of these principals exhibit bold, creative leadership in their drive to harness the potential of new technologies to further learning goals.

Beth Houf (@BethHouf), Fulton Middle School, Fulton, MO

Beth Houf is the proud principal of Fulton Middle School (FMS) in central Missouri. In her 11 years as principal, she has worked to implement a technology-infused vision among various stakeholders through initiatives including transforming the teacher evaluation program through technology; implementing FMS Passionate Learning, a digital innovation focused on personalized learning; and utilizing social media platforms to improve communication with parents and model digital citizenship and leadership for students. Houf is the co-author of Lead Like a PIRATE: Make School Amazing for Your Students and Staff. She also serves as a facilitator for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Leadership Academy, providing monthly training to state educational leaders, and is active in her local, state and national principal associations.

Chris Lehmann (@chrislehmann), Science Leadership Academy, Philadelphia, PA

Chris Lehmann is the founding principal and CEO of the Science Leadership Academy, an inquiry-driven, project-based, 1:1 laptop school that is considered to be one of the pioneers of the School 2.0 movement nationally and internationally. It is part of the Science Leadership Academy Schools network, a network of three progressive science and technology schools in Philadelphia. Since the school’s inception in 2006, Lehmann has focused on fulfilling its vision that technology should be ubiquitous, necessary, and invisible. He has created a Tech Team to manage and maintain the school’s technology; a web portal to allow students to work publicly on school blogs and learning tools; and an overall environment that empowers students to leverage technology in new and powerful ways. Chris is the co-author of Building School 2.0 and blogs regularly at www.practicaltheory.org.

Allison Persad (@apersad), The Young Women’s Leadership School of Astoria, Astoria, NY

Allison Persad is the principal of The Young Women’s Leadership School (TYWLS) of Astoria, where she prides herself on advancing a technology vision that offers agency and creative freedom to her teachers, students, and staff. In her tenure at TYWLS of Astoria, she has focused on a mission to ensure that all students have access to computer science, implementing a seven-year Software Engineering Program designed to help students think and solve critical problems in creative ways through the use and understanding of technology. In an effort to empower and educate girls through technology, the school became a 1:1 laptop environment that allows for the incorporation of technology in every course throughout the day. Persad has spent nearly 20 years as a student, teacher, coach, adjunct professor, and now principal of an all-girls public school in New York City.

“We are proud to honor Ms. Houf, Mr. Lehmann, and Ms. Persad for their extraordinary efforts to improve instruction, student achievement, and their own leadership through the use of technology in their schools,” stated NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti. “We commend these principals for leveraging technology as a resource to further build culture and lead learning to help prepare each student for success in college, citizenship, career, and life.”

To recognize the DPOY winners, the three principals will get an expenses-paid trip to participate at the 2019 National Principals Conference in Boston, July 18–20.

For more information on the DPOY program, please visit www.nassp.org/dpoy.


 About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor SocietyNational Junior Honor SocietyNational Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

NASSP and National Student Clearinghouse Collaborate to Help Principals Examine Effective Efforts for Postsecondary Success

HERNDON, VA (May 21, 2019)—The National Student Clearinghouse and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) announced today that they are collaborating to help principals examine how high school programs and policies lead to postsecondary success.

With the Clearinghouse’s nationwide secondary and postsecondary student data, principals can see exactly how each of their school’s graduates continue their formal learning beyond high school. Principals can also identify their most effective efforts that lead to students’ postsecondary success.

“The data provided by the Clearinghouse gives us access to how many of our students attend postsecondary institutions upon graduation, which is a valuable data tool we use to look at trends,” said Matthew Elder, assistant principal of Orange Vista High School in Perris, California. “We look at the institutions our students are attending and the timeframe when they attend those institutions. This information allows us to make our site’s postsecondary plans each year to narrow our focus for our students and staff.”

“Principals always want to know how well their graduates are doing in their postsecondary journey. But they too often have to rely on survey data, which provides a very limited and sometimes inaccurate picture,” said NASSP Executive Director JoAnn D. Bartoletti, who also serves on the Clearinghouse Board of Directors. “Collaborating with the Clearinghouse, NASSP can both provide principals access to a comprehensive set of objective data and help them maximize the use of that data to assess their own high school programs.”

“Working in a collaborative fashion with NASSP allows the Clearinghouse to have a greater understanding of the needs of secondary school principals and to address their most pressing challenges,” said Rick Torres, President and CEO of the Clearinghouse. “Our mutual efforts will better inform the nation’s K–12 leaders about student pathways to strengthen schools and help education go further with innovative approaches that meet reporting, research, verification, transcript, and data exchange demands across the K–20 to workforce continuum.”

Clearinghouse staff will host thought leadership conversations at the July 2019 National Principals Conference and the September 2019 NASSP Principal’s Institute Meeting. The two organizations will work together on joint articles, a national co-branded survey, sharing strategic information on each other’s websites, and webinar and strategy sessions to benefit secondary school leaders.

The Clearinghouse regularly works with educational organizations, including state and local agencies and principals throughout the country, to accurately assess the efforts of schools and outreach programs to help millions of students succeed each year and determine college and career readiness. Each fall, the Clearinghouse produces the High School Benchmarks report, which breaks down the nationwide data by school type (public, private, and charter) as well as demographic details.

Using the High School Benchmarks Report, high schools and school districts can conduct an apples-to-apples comparison between their school’s college enrollment, persistence, and graduation rates and those of similar schools across the country. The outcomes data is also formatted in percentile rankings, allowing schools to assess their performance relative to that of similar schools. The data empowers principals and administrators with accurate, reliable data to chart student success throughout college, answering such questions as:

  • How well are we preparing our students to get into college?
  • How many of our graduates enroll in college and graduate?
  • How well are we preparing our students to succeed once they are in college?
  • How do our school’s postsecondary education rates compare to other schools with similar populations?

Contact Todd Sedmak to set up an interview with the principal of a case-study school or a Clearinghouse official.


About the National Student Clearinghouse®

The National Student Clearinghouse, a nonprofit formed in 1993, is the trusted source for and leading provider of higher education verifications and electronic education record exchanges.

The Clearinghouse serves as a single point of contact for the collection and timely exchange of accurate and comprehensive enrollment, degree, and certificate records on behalf of its more than 3,600 participating higher education institutions, which represent 98 percent of all students in public and private U.S. institutions. The Clearinghouse also provides thousands of high schools and districts with continuing collegiate enrollment, progression, and completion statistics on their alumni.

Through its verification, electronic exchange, and reporting services, the Clearinghouse saves the education community cumulatively over $750 million annually. Most Clearinghouse services are provided to colleges and universities at little or no charge, including enhanced transcript and research services, enabling institutions to redistribute limited staff and budget resources to more important student service efforts. Clearinghouse services are designed to facilitate an institution’s compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, The Higher Education Act, and other applicable laws. The Clearinghouse has signed the Student Privacy Pledge and is the first recipient of ikeepsafe.org’s FERPA compliance badge, which was awarded to its StudentTracker for High Schools service.

For more information, visit www.studentclearinghouse.org.

About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high-quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor SocietyNational Junior Honor SocietyNational Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.

Literacy Proponents Celebrate Proposed Funding

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Advocates for Literacy, a coalition of over 60 organizations focused on increasing the federal commitment to improve literacy instruction through evidence-based practices, strongly supports the proposed $195 million for the Literacy Education for All, Results for the Nation (LEARN) program—referred to as comprehensive literacy development grants—in the House of Representatives’ Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (LHHS-Education) appropriations bill. Advocates for Literacy believes a strong federal commitment to literacy is imperative and is pleased that the House Committee on Appropriations has proposed an increase in funding for LEARN by $5 million over the FY 2019-enacted level.

LEARN supports states in a comprehensive, systemic approach to strengthen evidence-based literacy and early literacy instruction for children from early learning through high school and supports districts’ capacities to accelerate reading and writing achievement for all students. Additionally, LEARN helps states and districts support high-quality professional development for teachers, librarians, principals, specialized instructional support personnel, and other educators to improve literacy instruction for struggling readers and writers, including English-language learners and students with disabilities.

At a time when only 35 percent of fourth-grade students, 35 percent of eighth-grade students, and 37 percent of 12th-grade students performed at or above the proficient level on the reading assessment of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)—the Nation’s Report Card1—funding to support and improve literacy instruction is imperative. Advocates for Literacy is grateful to the House appropriators for recognizing the importance of high-quality reading and writing instruction to a quality education by proposing $195 million for LEARN in FY 2020, an increase of $5 million over the enacted FY 2019 level.

About Advocates for Literacy

Advocates for Literacy is a coalition of over 60 organizations that supports improved literacy instruction through comprehensive birth through grade 12 state-led literacy plans that target struggling and economically-disadvantaged students with low-performing English language arts assessment scores.

Members include:

Academic Language Therapy Association
ACT
Advocacy Institute
Alliance for Excellent Education
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
American Federation of Teachers
American Occupational Therapy Association
Association for Career and Technical Education
Association on Higher Education and Disability
Association for Middle Level Education
CAST
Center for the Collaborative Classroom
Council of Administrators of Special Education
Council for Exceptional Children
Early Care and Education Consortium
Easterseals
EDGE Consulting
Education Northwest
Every Child Reading
First Five Years Fund
First Focus Campaign for Children
Grimes Reading Institute
Higher Education Consortium for Special Education
HighScope Educational Research Foundation
Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters
Institute for Educational Leadership
International Dyslexia Association
International Literacy Association
Institute for Educational Leadership
Keys to Literacy
Knowledge Alliance
Learning Ally
Learning Disabilities Association of America
Learning First Alliance
Literacy How, Inc.
National Adolescent Literacy Coalition
National Association of Elementary School Principals
National Association of ESEA State Program Administrators (formerly the National Title I Association)
National Association of School Psychologists
National Association of Secondary School Principals
National Association of State Boards of Education
National Association of State Directors of Special Education
National Black Child Development Institute
National Black Justice Coalition
National Center for Families Learning
National Center for Learning Disabilities
National Council of Teachers of English
National Down Syndrome Congress
National Down Syndrome Society
National Education Association
National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grades Reform
National Rural Education Association
National Urban Alliance for Effective Education
National Women’s Law Center
National Writing Project
Nemours Children’s Health System
Parents as Teachers
Reading Partners
Reading Recovery Council of North America
Scholastic Inc.
School Social Work Association of America
TASH
Teach Plus
TESOL International Association
The Arc
United Way Worldwide
WestEd
ZERO TO THREE

1Fourth- and eighth-grade reading scores come from the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and 12th-grade reading scores come from the 2015 NAEP.

Education Groups Cheer Major New Investment in Professional Learning

Washington, D.C., April 30, 2019 – Major national associations representing K-12 educators praised the House Subcommittee on Appropriations for Labor-HHS-Education for proposing a $500 million increase in fiscal year 2020 for Title II-A, the Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants. This program provides states and school districts with funds to engage in professional learning, including allowing states to set aside funds to provide training and support specifically geared to principals and school leaders. The undersigned associations released the following statement:

“For the first time in a decade, the one program focused on ensuring that educators have sufficient professional learning, including mentoring and coaching, is in line to receive a significant—nearly 25%—increase in funding come next year. Even after Congress included a definition of professional development in 2015’s Every Student Succeeds Act that honors the kind of professional learning that teachers and leaders need and countless studies showed that educators are the most important factor in a child’s education, Title II-A funding has drifted steadily downward since 2010. The decision by Subcommittee Chair Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and her subcommittee to reverse this trend and support a reinvestment in America’s educators shows that they understand the merits and value of Title II-A. We thank them and urge the rest of the House and the Senate to follow their lead.”

American Federation of School Administrators
ASCD
Learning Forward
National Association of Elementary School Principals
National Association of Secondary School Principals
New Leaders

NASSP Names 2019 National Assistant Principal of the Year

NASSP logo

APOY logo

Meghan Redmond honored during National Assistant Principals Week

Reston – The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) has named Meghan Redmond, assistant principal of Chief Ivan Blunka School in New Stuyahok, AK, the 2019 National Assistant Principal of the Year. Her award announcement is made during NASSP’s annual celebration of National Assistant Principals Week.

Redmond is in her fourth year as assistant principal at Chief Ivan Blunka School in New Stuyahok, AK, a K–12 school consisting of 134 students who can only access the school by boat or plane. Because the remote nature of the school limits opportunities for exposure to various careers and other robust experiences, Redmond leads the school’s quarterly exploration weeks which allow students to focus on one or two courses that help them explore careers and interests—with some exploration weeks leading to industry-based certifications. “I never want my students to feel as if they missed out on anything because of where they are from or who they are,” Redmond said. “So, I have made it my mission to find creative solutions using technology; a strong school staff team; and partnerships with local, regional, and state entities in order to close the opportunity gap for my students.”

Redmond also started the Small Schools Matter group to draw attention to the needs of remote schools and recently brought students to the state capital of Juneau to advocate for funding. Driven to provide a culturally relevant education for the nearly 100 percent Yup’ik Eskimo Alaska Native population, Redmond incorporates the native language into the school. Such efforts build trust within the native community—a trust which is often tested by high teacher turnover in rural Alaska. The school’s administrative team focuses on valuing teacher talent in order to retain it, evidenced by a 100 percent staff retention rate for the current school year.

Redmond holds a bachelor’s degree in middle childhood and early adolescence education from the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire and a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Alaska–Anchorage. She also serves on the executive board for the Alaska Association of Secondary School Principals.

“Mrs. Redmond commits an exorbitant amount of time developing quality relationships with all of our students,” said Principal Robin Jones. “These relationships, built on trust and rapport, provide a solid foundation for challenging students to set goals and to reach their full potential. She builds these relationships in her role as assistant principal and also as the guidance counselor, student council advisor, and senior class advisor. Under Mrs. Redmond’s direction, students feel safe to take risks and explore the impossible.”

“Meghan Redmond is a shining example of the leadership NASSP describes in our Building Ranks framework,” said NASSP Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti. “Her efforts to build culture and lead learning at Chief Ivan Blunka School provide a platform for students to fulfill their greatest potential. We at NASSP are proud to congratulate her as our 2019 National Assistant Principal of the Year and commend her for her achievements.”

Redmond will formally receive her award during the National Principals Conference, July 18–20, in Boston.


About the NASSP National Assistant Principal of the Year

The NASSP National Assistant Principal of the Year (APOY) program annually recognizes outstanding middle level and high school assistant principals who have made exemplary contributions to their profession and to their students’ learning. Each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity, and the U.S. Department of State Office of Overseas Schools selects one assistant principal to represent their state. Of these, three finalists are named as contenders for the award, with one being recognized as the NASSP National Assistant Principal of the Year.

For more information on the APOY program, please visit www.nassp.org/apoy.

About NASSP

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for principals and other school leaders across the United States. NASSP seeks to transform education through school leadership, recognizing that the fulfillment of each student’s potential relies on great leaders in every school committed to the success of each student. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Student Council.