Building a Dual-Credit Program: An $8 Million Bargain for Students

Sale! Four-year degrees: 25% off! 

Get them while they’re hot! Four-year degrees—now available in under three years.

Today’s special! Start college as a sophomore!

If you walked along the sidewalk that runs in front of Homestead High School, it would not be misleading advertising to see these signs hanging in our windows—or to hear someone singing a little ditty about the joy of dual enrollment.

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Student Professional Learning Day: Future-Ready

As we near the end of the school year, I can honestly say that this has been the most challenging year as an educator. Our school has been in person since August, with additional precautions. Like most other schools, we spent a great deal of last summer preparing and planning for a year that had more questions than answers. There was so much uncertainty for the 2020–21 school year, yet I never felt so prepared to start the year because of the planning and organization. 

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Finding the ‘Why’ in School Improvement Plans

At some point in the career of every school leader, we reach a point where we feel like we are spinning our wheels, constantly pivoting to adapt to new changes or finding our community beginning to question the needs and effectiveness of existing initiatives and changes. It is inevitable that strong but elastic organizations will succeed at meeting the needs of stakeholders, while others will either fail to ever actualize their efforts or never reach a level of internal sustainability to avoid becoming stagnant. 

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Equity in Action: Four Steps for School Leaders

“What would you consider to be the most pressing concerns for leaders in education right now? What are the things that keep you up at night?” These were questions posed by my leadership coach in a recent meeting. Like most leaders, I started to run through all the items on my to-do list and the other things weighing on my mind.

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Share Your Thoughts on the New Title IX Rule on Sexual Harassment

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, while principals were focused on meeting the immediate needs of their school community, former U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos finalized the new Title IX rule on sexual harassment in K–12 schools and institutions of higher education in May 2020. NASSP submitted comments in opposition of the draft rule, which we felt would lessen protections for assault victims and hinder the ability of schools and educators to properly address claims of sexual assault. We also were strongly dismayed that the new rule became effective in August 2020, as school leaders prepared for the beginning of a new school year.

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Leave the Seed, Keep the Flesh: Reflections From Principalship and Motherhood

“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few,” says the Zen master Shunryu Suzuki. 

We thought we had it all figured out, like avocado toast. Pre-pandemic, we added pumpkin seeds and feta and Mike’s hot honey and slathered it on Mestemacher rye bread. We made guacamole and avocado quinoa bowls. But there was more to this berry, more to discover, and we had a year of a global pandemic to find truths. 

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Peer Mentoring to Build A Culture of Caring

As school leaders, we often ask ourselves: How can I be sure that I am meeting the needs of every one of my students? How can I ensure no one is forgotten? The kids who are naturally part of a group such as band, sports teams, Student Government Association, or clubs generally have found their niche in the school community. They have found their school family, those individuals who will support them throughout their high school career.  

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Impacting Education Through Advocacy

Education has been disrupted by COVID-19 for over a year, and school leaders are doing all they can to keep their staff and students safe while continuing effective learning. As policymakers at all levels of government weigh how to tackle the full impact on our public institutions, making sure the voices of school leaders are included in those decisions is vital. The 2021 NASSP Virtual Advocacy Conference provides an opportunity for school leaders and others to learn how to effectively influence lawmakers through activism. With the event fast approaching, past conference attendees have been reflecting on their experiences.

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Announcing the 2021 National Assistant Principal of the Year

Congratulations to Chelsea Jennings from Lakeside Junior High School!

Arkansas has the highest rate of adverse childhood experiences in the nation at 60%. Trauma and stress often manifest as behavior problems, and if educators can learn to see these as calls for help and opportunities to teach missing skills, they have the ability to lessen the negative impact and create productive learning environments centered on well-being and safety. For Assistant Principal Chelsea Jennings, that is “the heart of the work I strive daily to implement and nurture.”

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Are You the Next NASSP Board Member?

For the first time ever, the NASSP Board of Directors is opening nominations to all active members in good standing who are currently serving as principals or assistant principals. This unique opportunity is your chance to step forward as a board of directors candidate and be a national advocate for middle level and high school education!

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What Have We Learned?

We thought spring of 2020 was going to be our return to normalcy. 

We spent the fall and winter of the 2019–20 school year in complete crisis. Our school was supposed to be moving into a renovated co-located school building in fall of 2019, and when that project went into turmoil, so did our school. We spent 19 days in a construction site, then a month using the district office conference center as “drop-in” school while our classes moved online, until finally settling into the district conference center as our pop-up school for several months before finally returning to our building over President’s Day for what we thought was going to be our exciting return to a now-renovated school building.

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Purpose and the Assistant Principalship: Four Questions for Reflection

As an associate principal, I find my days filled with constant interactions with students, teachers, and support staff involving day-to-day operational needs, making decisions that affect everyone, acting as a sounding board, listening to various problems, observing and evaluating teachers, helping students and teachers reach their full potential, and doing things that impact our school culture. In my spare time, I am reading and responding to emails and making phone calls. Every day, I start my day hoping to make a difference or just make that one connection that may make someone smile. I enjoy walking the halls and hanging out in the cafeteria with students, checking in on them and wishing them a great day! Most students are used to the routine, so it becomes a race as to who wishes who a good day first. 

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Building a Restorative Justice Program

There are many types of restorative justice programs in schools, meaning that one size doesn’t fit all. Our motto here at Payson High School is “One Team, Making Today Count.” As a part of “Making Today County,” we encourage our students and staff to take advantage of all positive opportunities, no matter how small or inconsequential. As the principal I, too, identify issues, find the long-term solution, then identify positive opportunities to assist in that solution. This type of thinking has allowed Payson High School to create solid programs for students, become a National Showcase School for Capturing Kids’ Hearts, and a National Reference School District for Google. All of these were created through small opportunities that expanded in the end, and the creation of our restorative justice program is no different.

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Schools Can Emerge Stronger Only by Coming Together

Schools have not been closed—buildings have. Our educators—principals, teachers, and support staff—have worked tirelessly over the past year to address the unprecedented challenges the COVID-19 pandemic presented, including inequitable digital access, diminished learning opportunities, growing food insecurity, and numerous impacts to our students’ and educators’ well-being. Now, with support from the national administration and Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona, our schools will be more equipped to effectively meet the needs of all students.

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Quarantine Routines: An Educator’s Guide to Surviving a Quarantine

You will have to quarantine.

For many educators, these are the words we have lost sleep over, worried about hearing, and struggled to plan for when it does happen. While we are preparing lessons for our students who are at home learning and supporting our colleagues’ classes while they are at home, we are hoping that we will make it through this pandemic with it not happening to us. But what happens when it does? When a loved one we live with, someone we are close to, or ourselves are faced with a positive COVID-19 test and we have to quarantine? 

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Developing Awareness, Adaptability, and Flexibility as School Leaders

How did you start off this semester? Was it a reset, relaunch, reboot, or redux from the fall? Whatever structures were in place during the first semester as our schools offered in-person learning on campus at reduced capacity, remote or distance learning, or a hybrid of those approaches, we already know more than we did before about how to engage students and families, how to support staff, how to work toward the social-emotional needs of all stakeholders, and even how to practice self-care as leaders on our campuses. So what are we doing to capture the lessons we’ve learned, make any needed adjustments, keep our focus centered on student needs and move ahead during the spring of 2021?

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These Principals Are Getting Into Good Trouble

Mauri Friestleben and Yusuf Abdullah have been getting into trouble. Good Trouble, to be specific. During 2020, while leading their schools through distance learning, COVID-19, and racial injustice, they took it upon themselves to inspire and empower others to join together to challenge inequity in schools. Their movement has inspired many other principals, now bound together by their shared commitment to engage in justice, equity and liberation for all students. The resulting coalition calls itself “Good Trouble,” after a speech John Lewis gave. He said, “When you see something that is not right, not fair, say something. Do something. Get in trouble. Good trouble.” 

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Make Time to Attend the 2021 NASSP Advocacy Conference

It’s hard to believe that it’s already time to make plans for the 2021 NASSP Virtual Advocacy Conference. Maybe that is a function of time in this pandemic year—it seems to pass both slowly and quickly. While this pandemic year has been a long one, it seems like just yesterday that we scrambled to cancel travel plans for the 2020 event. Yet, here we are again, faced with the disappointment that we won’t be traveling to Washington, D.C., again this spring. 

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NAESP and NASSP Presidents Talk About Diversity

A conversation with Kimbrelle Barbosa Lewis and Robert Motley

We recently sat down with two eminent school leaders to discuss the importance of diversity in school leadership. Kimbrelle Barbosa Lewis is the principal of Cordova Elementary in Cordova, TN, as well as the president of the National Association of Elementary Principals (NAESP). Robert Motley is the principal of Atholton High School in Columbia, MD, and president of the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). They each shared their path to leadership in addition to valuable advice to others who want to pursue principalship.

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4 Ways All Principals Should Be Leading Digitally

The past year has forced all principals into technology, but true innovative principals are trailblazers who lead the way without the push of the pandemic. These leaders understand that technology can empower students to solve today’s complex problems and to engage with learning in a way that inspires progress and growth. It’s principals like this who are leveraging technology to close the equity divide, engage with all stakeholders in creative new ways, and work to cast a vision on how education and technology can converge to bring about the transformational change our education system needs. 

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